Low temp welding rods.

MarineScott

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Valencia PA.
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Hobart Handler 140
Low temp welding rods for steel.....really? I have seen these advertised for aluminum, and they work, as per videos I have seen. Do
 

Gary Fowler

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I dont think you will find low temp welding rods but I have seen some solder looking stuff advertised on youtube commercials. They show it adhering to brass, copper and steel without flux. However low temp usually mean low strength when talking about joining two pieces of steel. I see that the aluminum low temp rods seem to be stronger than the aluminum. The Project Farm youtube video did a comparison and IIRC, Hobart and amazingly Harbor Freight alumaweld products outperformed all the others. Check out his videos, he does a great job of comparing and testing products.
 

A-one

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Pine Bluff, Arkansas
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Lincoln Pro Mig 180
I've been meaning to get some of the Alumaweld rods to make repairs and add accessories to my boat. From the ads and videos I've seen, they make pretty solid connections.
 

Gary Fowler

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Did you watch the Project Farm comparison video. Some of the so called low temp rods didnt melt till almost the melting point of the aluminum which really weakened the metal. For the difference in price, the HF rods worked really just as well as the Hobart which was the winner in the comparison but the HF were a lot less money.
I have an aluminum spool gun, but I may pick up some of the HF rods just to try them.
 

MarineScott

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Valencia PA.
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Hobart Handler 140
Did you watch the Project Farm comparison video. Some of the so called low temp rods didnt melt till almost the melting point of the aluminum which really weakened the metal. For the difference in price, the HF rods worked really just as well as the Hobart which was the winner in the comparison but the HF were a lot less money.
I have an aluminum spool gun, but I may pick up some of the HF rods just to try them.
Yes, I did watch it. Might have to try it too.
 

Gary Fowler

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I am not sure what the "low temp" welding rods are supposed to be. They are shown joining copper, brass & steel and claim 40K tensile strength (a claim I seriously doubt) and stronger than steel which would be true if they have 40K strength seeing as how mild steel is only 36K tensile. Generally speaking, low temp melting point equates to low strength, so I am a bit skeptical.
 

MarineScott

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Valencia PA.
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Hobart Handler 140
I am not sure what the "low temp" welding rods are supposed to be. They are shown joining copper, brass & steel and claim 40K tensile strength (a claim I seriously doubt) and stronger than steel which would be true if they have 40K strength seeing as how mild steel is only 36K tensile. Generally speaking, low temp melting point equates to low strength, so I am a bit skeptical.
I would agree, that is what I was wanting to know. If you notice, there is no penetration, almost how an epoxy would work. Gimmick or not? What is the true application?
 

bplayer405

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I've been meaning to get some of the Alumaweld rods to make repairs and add accessories to my boat. From the ads and videos I've seen, they make pretty solid connections.
I have successfully sealed some open old rivet holes from a removed bracket on my boat's floor, but the stuff won't take any flexing action. I tried numerous times to fill I a crack on top of the transom, but it never lasts more than a couple short trips on the water. It's the reason I now have a mig spool gun setup and saving up for a tig.
 

MarineScott

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Valencia PA.
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Hobart Handler 140
I have successfully sealed some open old rivet holes from a removed bracket on my boat's floor, but the stuff won't take any flexing action. I tried numerous times to fill I a crack on top of the transom, but it never lasts more than a couple short trips on the water. It's the reason I now have a mig spool gun setup and saving up for a tig.
Probably, because there is no penetration.
 

sonny580

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Arrowsmith, Illinois
I see this stuff as a rip-off! --- might as well dump Elmer's glue on it. Probably hold just as good. If it dont penetrate----it cant hold.
 

Gary Fowler

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I agree, their 40K tensile strength might (read MIGHT) be indicative of the rod's strength but for sure not it's bonding strength to metal. I would like to see some ASME Section IX bend and tension test done on a sample
 

PILOON

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North of Montreal
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Hobart 200 stick
If you are only wanting to plug holes and not looking for structural strength I'd urge considering a polyurethane caulking* as sold in home renovation centers.
From experience I also know a patch can be successfully made.
That poly caulk has most of the qualities of automotive windshield adhesive.
Once cured you have to chisel it off.

* one brand I've used is Flextra.
 

A-one

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Pine Bluff, Arkansas
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Lincoln Pro Mig 180
Speaking of TIG, I've seen where it's possible to TIG really thin aluminum on DC. I think that would be really nice to repair the thin aluminum on a jon boat.Thoughts anyone?
 

Yomax4

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MN.
Those Magic rods are simply Zinc. Harris 52, Weldcote Alumite, Aladin. Many others. Sticks to anything but not very well. I used to show it at farm shows fixing bullet holes in irrigation pipe. Worked great at the show. Not so much out in the field.
 

Gary Fowler

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Speaking of TIG, I've seen where it's possible to TIG really thin aluminum on DC. I think that would be really nice to repair the thin aluminum on a jon boat.Thoughts anyone?
I do know that you can TIG weld aluminum on DC if you use Helium on the torch instead of argon but not so much on really thin aluminum. Perhaps on thicker stuff it may be possible but it is still really hard to keep it clean enough with this process. You dont get the cleaning effect of the AC high frequency so the oxides that form almost instantly after cleaning make it really hard to tie in.
 

A-one

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Pine Bluff, Arkansas
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Lincoln Pro Mig 180
I guess that's out until I can get my hands on an AC/DC machine. I'm going to give TIG a try. I might be able to get it together well enough to do small parts.
 

Gary Fowler

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I guess that's out until I can get my hands on an AC/DC machine. I'm going to give TIG a try. I might be able to get it together well enough to do small parts.
To me, TIG was one of the easiest processes to learn. I passed my first TIG pipe welding test on Nickel alloy (very hard to weld) with only a couple days of practice and that was with absolutely no previous experience welding TIG. Heck, I didnt even know how to set up the rig or sharpen the tungsten to start with. After welding up about a dozen 4" coupons, I was ready to go take the pipe test. Passed it and went straight to welding 100% xray welds. You do need to be a bit ambidextrous so you can feed the wire with one hand while controlling the torch with the other (preferable able to switch hands) but I have seen some fair welders that could only do it on way.
Start with a TIG finger (you can buy them at "WeldMonger.com) which I made mine with TIG wire and masking tape. Use the middle finger with the insulated insert that holds the TIG torch to make a bridge support to steady you hand and just slide it along . Slightly harder to learn is what they call "walking the cup" technique. That technique results in a really uniform weld with good color of the weld metal. That style is too hard to explain but there are surely some youtube videos on it. Be prepared to go thru lots of Argon before you get good at it but it is a very forgiving process, If you dont like how it looks just go back over the weld "dry washing " it to smooth it out.
 
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